Dyslexia Friendly Classroom

When parents of a dyslexic child ask that their son’s or daughter’s school will become dyslexia friendly, a common response is that turning an educational institution to a dyslexia friendly school is very expensive.

My answer to their wish is straightforward, instead, ask your teacher to make his or her study-room a dyslexia friendly classroom, and in order to do so you mainly need awareness.

1. When you print or send an e-mail use dyslexia friendly font such as Arial, Verdana, Tahoma
2. Use colored paper for your printouts instead of white paper.
3. Make sure that pupils with dyslexia can see your face when you speak in classroom.
4. Give pupils with dyslexia time to get organized before starting the lesson.
5. Don’t make a student with dyslexia read out loud before he is ready

Dyslexic Kids and Mobile Messaging

We are communicating with each other using text with messaging more now than we ever have before. Not long ago the main means of communication was speaking to one another but today text messaging has come to the fore.

Who doesn’t use today mobile messaging- Facebook messaging, iMessage, Whatsapp, Skype etc. to communicate? We all do and our kids much more than we.

Here are some mobile messaging statistics regarding kids:

– 75% of adolescents aged 12 to 17 have a cell phone.

– Kids between the ages of 13 and 17 send an average of 3364 text messages per month.

– Half of teenagers send 50 text messages or more every day. One third send 100 or more texts a day.

Mobile texting usually adopts a very informal language. Keyboard errors resulting in spelling mistakes, the wish to be concise (type less) even at the expense of correct English and grammar – is very common in mobile texting.

So when our Dyslexic kids write text messaging with errors should we encourage them to stop and review their text before sending the message? My answer is that it depends …

Difficult Times for Dyslexic Kids and Teenagers.

The summer vacation is almost over, and millions of kids and teenagers are about to return to school. As a dyslexic child, I remember these days to be very difficult.

The end of the summer break was a time when, on the one hand I could still smell Summer’s activities when my dyslexia and dysgraphia did not affect me, and on the other hand the clock was ticking in my head with alarming sound, saying, so and so days to school, so and so days back to facing my writing and reading limitations, or even more so, facing a new class and unfamiliar teachers.

I hope this short blog will help parents of kids and teenagers with dyslexia understand why this is a hard time for their dyslectic kid.

Starting a New School Could Be an Opportunity for a Student with Dyslexia.

The summer vacation is almost over, and millions of kids and teenagers will start a new school after their summer activities.

It can be very hard for a kid with dyslexia or dysgraphia to start a new school since he is leaving his comfort zone where he is already familiar with the teachers and classmates.

I believe a student with dyslexia could see a change of school as an opportunity.

In order to make the most, the child and his parents need to sit down and perform a strings and weakness table. You can do it since you already have experience coping with dyslexia and dysgraphia.

The result of the strings and weakness table needs to be an action plan for the first month in school.

The action plan may include all aspects of being a student, for example:

• Social – Making new friends in school.
• Learning – what I need to do in order to succeed in class
• Technology – which assistive technology I need in order to cope with my dyslexia or dysgraphia

Dyslexia symptoms, causes and types of dyslexia

Guest blog by Melody Cleo

Dyslexia symptoms, causes and types of dyslexia:

Dyslexia refers to a learning disability which is common in children. This disorder makes children find it difficult to write, read spell and sometimes even experience hindrance in speaking. Although the severity of this disorder can range from being mild to severe it can be treated successfully with timely intervention. In many cases owing to the absence of any obvious symptoms Dyslexia goes undetected in many children during their early years. The difficulty faced by such children in being able to learn easily often makes them go through extreme degree of frustration and may show visible signs of being depressed and suffer from low self-esteem.

The Symptoms of Dyslexia:

1. the most common symptom of Dyslexia in a child is his tendency to write numbers and letters in a reversed fashion. While such reversals are quite common in children up to the age of eight, if this problem persists then the child should be tested for Dyslexia.

2. Inability to copy from the book or the board in the classroom is also suggestive of a problem and can be a symptom of Dyslexia.

3. Disorganized writing and failure to be able to retain content of a text is also suggestive of Dyslexia.

4.While Dyslexia is primarily a learning disorder children suffering from this condition may also face significant difficulty in outdoor activities owing to their inability to judge left or right , speed of a moving object or even determining special relationships.

5. Another common symptom of Dyslexia is auditory difficulty. A child suffering from this disorder experiences difficulty in following multiple commands or may even fail to recollect something heard clearly. They also experience issues in being able to express their thoughts clearly through words.

6. One of the most pronounced symptom of Dyslexia is that a child gets confused by words, letters, numbers, sequence and verbal explanation.

7. Apart from the above academic symptoms a child suffering from Dyslexia also exhibits some emotional symptoms like depression, withdrawal symptoms, and low levels of self-confidence and lack of motivation.

Causes and types of Dyslexia:

The following are the different types of Dyslexia which also explains what causes them.

1) Trauma Dyslexia – This type of Dyslexia is a rare scenario where a child suffers from the disorder owing to some injury or trauma in that part of the brain which controls writing and reading.

2) Primary Dyslexia – Primary Dyslexia refers to a kind of dysfunction of the cerebral cortex which is on the left side of the brain. This kind of disorder does not change with the advancement of age and is usually hereditary. Primary Dyslexia is more predominant in boys rather than girls.

3) Development of secondary Dyslexia – Secondary or Development Dyslexia is caused by hormonal development of the foetus in the early stage. This type of Dyslexia diminishes with age and even this is found more in boys than girls.

Dyslexia also hinders several functions like visual Dyslexia and Auditory Dyslexia .Visual Dyslexia leads to a child having difficulty in writing letters properly and often leading to letter reversals and inability to follow the correct sequence while writing. Auditory Dyslexia on the other hand is characterized by the child having difficulty in perceiving the sound of the letters or words correctly.

Hence these are the causes and symptoms of Dyslexia which if identified in children should always be taken seriously. It is important to note that if treated early Dyslexia can be cured easily and it saves the child from going through the unnecessary stress of being unable to go through the learning tasks unlike their peers. Apart from being able to identify the correct time when one should seek medical intervention it is also important to be able to bear the financial expenses of the treatment.

Author Bio:

Melody Cleo is a passionate blogger from Manchester, UK. In her free time, she writes articles on various topics such as technology, gadgets, travel…etc. As of now she is focusing on EHIC, which provides health insurance services for the European people.

Diagnosing Dyslexia

The earlier a child with dyslexia is diagnosed, the more effective his/her treatment could be.

Identifying dyslexia

In practice, identifying dyslexia in younger children can be very difficult for both parents and teachers because the signs and symptoms are often subtle. However, early continuing difficulties with differentiating sounds, particularly at the beginning or end of a word, can be a sign of possible difficulties in the future.

Many children, including younger children, also develop ways to compensate for their dyslexia, such as relying on their long-term memory more than usual or by ‘picturing’ the whole word.

Signs and symptoms of dyslexia you need to be looking for:

  1. Directional confusion- for example, writing 69 instead of 96
  2. Sequencing difficulties- for example, reading the letters in a word in a wrong sequence
  3. Difficulties with small words- for example, replacing “a” for “and”
  4. Late talking
  5. Difficulties with handwriting

This is a partial list of dyslexia signs. In any case you think there is a problem with your child,  take him/her to a professional diagnostics.

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